Every year we read stories about hikers losing their footing and falling on Lion’s Head. Some are lucky enough to make it off the summit with a few minor injuries. Unfortunately many others have not been let off that lightly.

Although highly popular for hikers and an icon in its own regard, Lion’s Head is by no means an easy stroll. When you ascend the summit, the rewarding view is well worth it, but great care and common sense should be applied by those planning to scale this peak.

Recent news doing the rounds is that yesterday a 13-year old dropped 10m and sustained head injuries. Subsequently, the teen was airlifted to hospital and is reported to be in a stable condition. Details are unclear as to what exactly happened, but we can be confident that he lost his footing somewhere along the way.

There are certain sections of the trail leading up to the summit where only one person at a time can make it through, and on busy nights such as the Lion’s Head Full Moon Hike this precaution is often overlooked by enthusiastic hikers wanting to make it to the top in the quickest time possible.

Lion’s Head is a peak which commands respect. It is important to know that several lives have been lost here in recent times, certainly a handful within the past decade. If you’re heading up with a group of friends, be methodical in your ascent, take your time to observe the high-risk areas where the trail becomes narrow. Do not pose dangerously to get that perfect photo for Instagram – this includes selfies and yoga stances. Be mindful of trail runners blazing up and down the track. But most importantly, use common sense.

Despite being stone’s throw away from the city, the mountain is a wild place and respect should be paid to it when visiting.

Source News24
Photography HSM Images

Article written by

Justin

Justin Williams is a born-and-bred Capetonian with a flair for writing. His icons include the late South African authors Lawrence Green, Eric Rosenthal and T.V. Bulpin, literary figures who continuously inspire him to cover the avenues of lifestyle, travel and nature in a local context. When he's not covering a story, Justin can be found in the mountains - he's a renowned wild food forager and herbalism student.