The Mother City’s beaches have been awarded Blue Flag status yet again, as 10 of Cape Town’s most-loved beaches have achieved international accreditation due to their excellence.

To receive Blue Flag status, beaches must meet 33 criteria covering four categories, namely environmental education and information, water quality, environmental management and safety and services.

The Cape Town beaches that achieved the status are: Bikini Beach, Gordons Bay; Camps Bay; 4th Beach, Clifton; Fish Hoek; Llandudno; Melkbosstrand; Mnandi; Muizenberg; Silwerstroomstrand; and Strandfontein.

Seaforth beach is still within its trial period and its status is yet to be announced.

“The City is honoured to once again be part of the Blue Flag programme, with 10 of our beaches making the cut,” said the Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services and Health, Zahid Badroodien. “The Blue Flag beaches are geographically well-positioned around the metropole, from Silwerstroomstrand in the north, beaches on the Atlantic Seaboard, to the secluded little Bikini Beach next to the Gordons Bay harbour in the south. These beaches are visited by thousands of residents and tourists every year and the City is making sure that they are of a high standard.”
Over 330 lifeguards have been stationed at public bathing areas around the city to ensure the safety of visitors. According to the Recreation and Parks Department, the number of fatal drownings in 2018/2019 compared to the last summer period has already experienced a 50% reduction.

“The reduction was as a result of increased education and awareness around the type of behaviours that put bathers at risk, but also the heroics and vigilance of our lifeguards. It is a massive undertaking to keep an eye on the thousands of people who descend on our beaches over the peak summer season, particularly on the priority days like Boxing and New Year’s Day. Our staff work tirelessly to ensure a quality experience for all visitors to our facilities, but ultimately it’s a two-way street and we need the public to support us by listening to lifeguards and other City staff, and to swim only in designated areas. Other concerns that our lifeguards have to contend with include drinking and swimming and unsupervised children,” said Badroodien.

Pictures: The City of Cape Town

Article written by

Aimee Pace

Aimee is an avid gamer, enthusiastic yogi and animal lover. Addicted to anime, coffee and plant-based meals. Current favourite pastimes include, sewing and learning Japanese.