From April 22 to 28, Cape Town and Two Oceans Aquarium is celebrating our favourite little tuxedo-wearing flightless birds, penguins.

These adorable seabirds are iconic symbols of Cape Town, with one of the biggest existing colonies of endangered African penguins living right here in Boulders Beach.

As we celebrate the existence of these amazing creatures, we take a look at some of the best snaps of our local penguin residents:

 

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We know about Zebra crossings, but penguin crossings? Only in Simon’s Town! ? @visitbouldersbeach

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Your Saturday plans could include a trip to see the penguins at Boulders Beach. ? @travel.bug.diaries

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It’s World Penguin Day! One of my favourite days ever was getting to see these lovely little ones in the wild at Boulders Beach in SA. ?

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Happy World Penguin Day!!! ??❤️

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Penguin facts from Two Oceans Aquarium:

– Both males and females share the responsibility of incubating their eggs

– There are between 16 and 19 species of penguin, divided into six families

– The oldest penguin fossil ever found is 62-million years old

– Penguins’ black and white colouring acts as camouflage while they are in the water

– Most penguins eat a combination of fish, squid and krill

– Most penguin species are monogamous and choose the same mate every season

– Most penguin species numbers are on the decline and vulnerable to extinction.

How you can help:

Choose WWF SASSI Green seafood
Download the WWF SASSI app and make sure you eat on sustainable seafood options that are Green listed.

– Support rehabilitation
Amazing local organisations like SANCCOB and APSS help save the lives of hundreds of African penguins that are affected by disasters such as oil spills, avian diseases and entanglement. By supporting these organisations, you help give penguins a second chance.

– Relocation project
BirdLife South Africa has a plan to relocate penguins from the Atlantic Ocean where food is increasingly scarce as a result of overfishing and changing ocean temperatures. BirdLife plans to create new penguin colonies in the Indian Ocean, where food is more plentiful and there are safer breeding sites away from potential predators. You can help BirdLife SA save penguins by making a donation.

Get more information here.

Picture: Instagram/Team Endemic Birds

Article written by

Aimee Pace

Aimee is an avid gamer, enthusiastic yogi and animal lover. Addicted to anime, coffee and plant-based meals. Current favourite pastimes include, sewing and learning Japanese.