The community of Observatory in Cape Town has set a stellar example for locals with its recent art project to transform an unsightly subway tunnel in the neighbourhood with a little paint, some elbow grease and a lot of teamwork.

On May 25, Observatory residents gathered together to paint and breathe new life into the graffiti ridden Trill Road subway by creating a multicoloured pixelated effect in its place.

Trill Road subway before the art project.

An amazing team of locals led by a resident artist took to the subway tunnel and transformed the drab coloured off-white tiles, painting each individually to create a chequered technicolour wall.

The project attracted almost the entire neighbourhood, with members young and old taking up their brushes to improve the appearance of a well-used part of the neighbourhood and uniting as a community.

The tunnel being transformed by the community.

Even a neighbourhood dog called Ms Pixel who was apparently the inspiration behind the painting concept joined in on the project.

Ms Pixel joining in on the project.

Although the project is not yet complete, no community member can pass through the tunnel without beaming with pride.

Resident Kami Gordon shared a post on social media, saying, “Went through the tunnel today for the first time and I felt so proud of all of you!! Made my heart lift.”

The tunnel after the first day of the project.

The tunnel is now a shining representation of the beautiful community and all their creativity and colour.

Locals joining in on the fun.

Any resident who has not yet had their chance to add their own coloured tile to the subway walls can still take part by joining the community again this Saturday, June 1 from 10am to sunset to finish off the painting.

A cute little community member happily poses in front of the newly painted wall.

“So glad we can walk through the subway now with happy hearts,” said another resident, Astrid Osborn.

The little community of Observatory took the initiative and changed a big part of their neighbourhood in a meaningful way, and Capetonians across our beautiful city could definitely learn a thing or two from these exemplary locals.

Pictures: Facebook/Edwin Angless/Astrid Osborn

Article written by

Aimee Pace

Aimee is an avid gamer, enthusiastic yogi and animal lover. Addicted to anime, coffee and plant-based meals. Current favourite pastimes include, sewing and learning Japanese.