Dam levels in the Cape have slightly decreased by 0.6% over the weekend, despite water consumption decreasing by a staggering 34 million litres per day.

Current water levels are measured at 74.1% storage capacity with a minor decrease of 0.6%  – the capacity of Theewaterskloof dam has declined by 0.6% and is 57.4% full.

Accompanied with the drop in dam water levels is the stark decline in water consumption levels. The City of Cape Town issued that water usage has dropped by 34 million litres per day, going from 593 to 559 million litres per day, over the past week.

City of Cape Town/ Dam level reading on November 5

This comes as positive news for the Mother City, as this number is much closer to the city’s goal of using no more than 500 million litres a day, amid level 5 water restrictions.

Locals are encouraged to maintain reasonable usage levels in this range as the city must adhere to limits imposed by the National Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS).

DWS will release a statement in December regarding the water usage limit for Cape Town in the new year.

This chart shows a comparison of dam levels from the previous week:

The City of Cape Town/ Dam levels now compared with last week’s readings and 2017’s readings

The City has issued a reminder of the level 5 restrictions dont’s: 

1. Swimming pools are not to be filled with municipal drinking water.

2. No vehicles, including boats, caravans and more, may be cleaned with municipal water.

3. No washing or hosing down of hard surfaces with municipal water.

4. The use of any portable or temporary play pools are banned.

5. Municipal drinking water may not be used for ornamental fountains or water features.

6. Operation of spray parks are prohibited.

7. Borehole water may only be used for a one-hour period on Tuesdays and Saturdays before 9am and after 6pm. The City discourages the use of borehole water for garden use or topping up swimming pools.

Picture: Unsplash

Article written by

Ishani Chetty

Ishani is a vegetarian who is passionate about social issues, the environment and current affairs.