We’ve seen a good amount of rainfall this June. Let’s investigate how this has affected Cape Town dam levels.

Collectively, our dams across the Western Cape have risen by less than 4% following the numerous cold fronst which have reached the Cape, bringing what was seemingly a hearty amount of rainfall – but sadly nowhere near enough to get us out of the danger zone. Instead, the City of Cape Town has declared that water consumption has spiked in recent days.

Cape Town dam levels

Dam storage levels are presently at 23.1% – effectively 13.1% as the final 10% has been deemed as ‘unusable’.

“Due to the severity of the drought, above-target consumption, as well as the unpredictability of climatic conditions, Level 4 water restrictions remain in place indefinitely over the long-term and could be intensified if warranted,” the City said in a statement on Monday.

“Apart from safeguarding our current sustainability, we must think about building additional reserve capacity by continuing with the most hard-hitting water-saving efforts that we can muster. It may take a few seasons of normal rainfall for the dams to recover and we must bear in mind that we are expecting an even tougher summer in 2018.”

 

 

Photography Unsplash

Article written by

Justin

Justin Williams is a born-and-bred Capetonian with a flair for writing. His icons include the late South African authors Lawrence Green, Eric Rosenthal and T.V. Bulpin, literary figures who continuously inspire him to cover the avenues of lifestyle, travel and nature in a local context. When he's not covering a story, Justin can be found in the mountains - he's a renowned wild food forager and herbalism student.